Author Profile: Felicity Nie

On This Day: Enter the AK-47

On July 6, 1947, the former Soviet Union began producing the AK-47 assault rifle. Named after its designer Mikhail Kalashnikov, the AK-47 (Automatic Kalashnikov 1947) remains one of the world’s most popular weapons. There are estimated 100 million AK-47s in the world, or one for every 60 people and about one-fifth of all firearms worldwide. During the Cold War, the…

Why You Should Travel Solo This Summer

It’s summertime, and we’re all in vacation mode looking for travel deals, last minute getaways, or just amazing places that make for jealous worthy Instagram posts. We all want to escape those workplace doldrums, but, sometimes, planning a summer vacation with someone seems like more stress than it’s worth. That trip to the beach would be a great idea, but…

On This Day: American Railroads Become Regulated

On June 29, 1906, Congress passed the Hepburn Act, which essentially strengthened government regulation of the railroad industry. The Hepburn Act’s strict regulations forced railroad companies to follow provisions and pay penalties for violations set by the government through the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC). It was perhaps the most important piece of legislation regarding railroads in the 20th century, since…

On This Day: The G.I. Bill Transformed America

On June 22, 1944, President Roosevelt signed the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944, better known as the G.I. Bill. Providing several financial and educational benefits for World War II veterans, the G.I. Bill was a major political and economic success that contributed to America’s postwar economic stability and long-term growth. Veterans could receive low-interest loans to start a business, low-cost…

Healthy Eating on a Budget, Just Follow These Simple Steps

I survived graduate school on a solid diet of instant ramen noodles, Papa John’s pizzas, and frozen burritos, but I recently decided that it was time to change my ways. Maybe I’m just getting older and realizing that health matters, or maybe health food product marketing is working its magic. Either way, I decided to make the switch to a…

On This Day: The $200K Octagon Coin

On June 15, 1915, the U.S. minted the only octagon-shaped coin in U.S. history. The coin was one of two $50 coins (the other one was round) issued as part of a set of five commemorative gold coins designed for the Panama-Pacific International Exposition held in San Francisco between February and December 1915. The U.S. Mint struck 1,500 pieces of…

5 Credit Card Facts You Didn’t Know About

How to Lower Interest Rates on Credit Cards

Over 167 million American adults have at least one credit card. That’s 70% of all consumers dealing with monthly credit card bills and different credit card benefits, fees, interest rates, and reward programs. Credit cards have become a part of most of our lifestyles. But, when and why did we all start paying with plastic? Here are 5 facts that…

On This Day: Hamilton and U.S. Debt

On June 8, 1790, the United States paid back a loan that it had borrowed from the Bank of New York and Bank of North America. Secretary of Treasury Alexander Hamilton oversaw the $19,608.81 loan that was issued on September 18, 1789. It was the first loan issued to the United States government (under the new Constitution that was ratified June…

On This Day: No More Siesta?

On June 1, 1944, the Mexican government officially abolished the siesta. Though work hours averaged just as long as those in the U.S., the workday in Mexico included the siesta, a two to three hour break to go home, enjoy a big lunch, and take a nap. By the 1940s, Mexico City, a bustling industrial center, found that the four…

Here’s How Obama’s New ‘Student Aid Bill of Rights’ will Affect You

Over 70% of those earning a bachelor’s degree graduate with debt averaging almost $30,000. It’s been called a “student debt crisis” as the cost of college education rises (the cost of college has increased 225% over the last 30 years) and new graduates struggle with repayment plans (complaints against student lenders went up 38% last year) There’s some comfort to…